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PureAire Oxygen Analyzers & Oxygen Monitors for Nitrogen Generators or Air Separation Plant

Nitrogen has many uses in industrial applications where oxidation would be undesirable. From carbonizing beer to preserving food, reducing fire danger, and cleaning equipment, nitrogen is a safe, inexpensive gas. For companies that need a steady supply of nitrogen gas, nitrogen generators work well. Learn about the uses of nitrogen generators and why you should use oxygen monitors in environments where nitrogen gas is created.

How Nitrogen Generators Wor

Nitrogen for packaging works well in the food and beverage industry for food packaging and bottling of wine. Nitrogen also helps with metal processing, improving the end quality of the product by reducing the chance for oxidation. In the pipeline industry, nitrogen creates a high pressure environment that improves safety.

Nitrogen generators allow you to create nitrogen from compressed air. If you use nitrogen cylinders, then you know how inconvenient they can be. If your supplier is late, you risk running out of nitrogen you need to run your business.

These generators are easy to operate. All you need to do is connect a compressed air line to the inline for the nitrogen generator. Then connect the outlet to the nitrogen line. Now, the generator can run continuously, and can create nitrogen gas that has as little as 10 parts per million of O2. An oxygen analyzer can help you measure the amount of oxygen in the nitrogen gas, to ensure consistency

It is both easy and cost-effective to use the nitrogen generator in-house. Since you can create nitrogen 24/7, the generator will pay for itself quickly and free you from the dependency on suppliers.

By adding an oxygen analyzer to the nitrogen generator, you can check the level of oxygen present in the nitrogen gas at any time. Purity of the nitrogen is key to successful application. The O2 analyzer runs constantly, allowing you to take at-a-glance readings and make sure that everything is working properly.

Air separation is an alternative to purchasing a nitrogen generator. In an air separation plant, you can separate the air into its elemental components. Natural air is compressed and sieved, to remove any impurities. The compressed air is heated and cooled until the different elements reach boiling points, and separate out. The elements are then returned to a gaseous state, at which point they are ready to be used. As with nitrogen generators, air separation plants benefit from the use of an O2 analyzer to keep an eye on the levels of oxygen.

Safety Benefits of Oxygen Monitors and Analyzer

While oxygen analyzers are beneficial, they also have a practical purpose when used with an air separation plant or nitrogen generator. The oxygen analyzer helps ensure that the nitrogen gas has a very low level of oxygen. It can measure oxygen levels from 0-1000 ppm and keep the oxygen to the minimum needed for your specific usage.

An oxygen monitor can check the environment for levels of oxygen in the air. As long as there is enough oxygen in the air, then the O2 monitor is silent. Should levels of oxygen drop, the O2 monitor will sound an alarm and flash a light, alerting workers to the situation. While nitrogen generators do have a leak detection system, it's a good idea to add an oxygen monitor as a failsafe.

Nitrogen gas actually depletes the levels of oxygen in the air. If enough nitrogen gas were to leak out, it would reduce the oxygen below safe levels. As a result, workers could become unconscious, experience dizziness, or even die from asphyxiation. By having an oxygen monitor, you can ensure that there is no leak of nitrogen gas from the generator or supply lines.

PureAire offers oxygen monitors with a zirconium oxide sensor. Capable of lasting for up to 10 years with no maintenance, these O2 monitors are a reliable way to ensure that nitrogen does not pose a health hazard in your plant. When coupled with the oxygen analyzer, they allow you to product nitrogen to run your business without creating a health risk for your employees.

To learn more about the oxygen analyzers and monitors offered by PureAire, please visit www.pureairemonitoring.com.




PureAire Oxygen Analyzer for 3D Printers: How Argon is used and Why O2 Detection is Required

Thanks to new technologies, the 3D printers that have been used to create plastic three-dimensional objects can now print metal. Titanium 3D printing is possible thanks to a technique called DMLS, or Direct Metal Laser Sintering. While the potential to use titanium 3D printing is groundbreaking for many industries, the new advances could pose a health hazard if volatile gases used in the printing process are not contained. Learn more about the role of argon in 3D printing and how an oxygen analyzer can safeguard your employing while printing.

What Happens in Direct Metal Laser Sintering?

3D printing of plastics uses an additive process in which objects are constructed layer by layer or fused together cross section by cross section. These basic techniques need rethinking for titanium 3D printing. With Direct Metal Laser Sintering, a laser follows a computer-aided design (CAD) file to melt titanium powder, rendering the object. The process is similar to sculpture, in which pieces of the raw material are carved away to create or reveal a three-dimensional object or figure.

Because titanium is such a strong metal, the resulting objects are highly durable. For something like medical devices or three-dimensional replacement joints or bones, this means that individuals can get greater use out of the replacement part. Aviation professionals greet these new developments, estimating that titanium parts can cut the weight of an airplane by as much as 1,000 pounds, saving fuel on every flight.

Since the titanium powder (Or other metal powders) used in this additive manufacturing process is created from manufacturing remnants, the materials are highly cost-effective.

What are the Risks of 3D Printing?

The 3D printer operates in an inert environment, where argon prevents any unwanted chemical reactions from taking place and maintains the purity of components. The inert environment in the 3D printing machine keeps the oxygen content low, to reduce oxidization in the manufactured part. It also reduces the fire hazard by rendering combustible dust inert. Since thermal stress is controlled and titanium powder clumping is reduced, the argon improves the consistency of the final product and reduces deformities.

While there are many benefits to using argon in the printing process, and argon is harmless when contained, it does pose a health risk should the argon escape the additive manufacturing environment.

Argon is known as an oxygen displacer. This means that when argon gas leaks into the air, it physically displaces the levels of oxygen in the air. In extreme cases, staff can asphyxiate due to the lack of oxygen in the environment.

This gas is colorless, tasteless, and odorless. Were argon to leak out of the 3D printer, staff would be unable to see or smell it. As soon as oxygen begins to deplete from the room, it cause symptoms including dizziness, shortness of breath, and confusion. Even if staff suspect that something is wrong, they may be unable to escape from the area before it is too late.

When you have a poorly ventilated manufacturing space with several 3D printers going at once, the potential for oxygen displacement by argon gas increases.

How Can an O2 Analyzer Reduce Risks?

An O2 Analyzer helps keep levels inside the 3D printing environment low, to ensure the printer works optimally. Without the analyzer, there would be no way to ensure that the ppm concentration of oxygen remained at a steady state for the duration of the printing process. The oxygen analyzer checks levels of oxygen ranging from 0 to 1,000 parts per million (ppm). 3D printers using the DMLS process need to keep the oxygen under 1% or less for product manufacturing. A 0 to 25% oxygen range detector is also available. The oxygen analyzer can make sure that the air inside the chamber meets the low levels needed. Meanwhile the air outside is safe for staff to breath. PureAire's oxygen analyzers are easy to install and easy to use. Once set up, they require no maintenance and will work as promised for a set period of time.

At PureAire, we have just developed a new oxygen analyzer that works with 3D printers. To learn more about our new oxygen analyzer, please visit www.pureairemonitoring.com or send an email to info@pureaire.net

Source

http://nj.gov/health/eoh/rtkweb/documents/fs/0151.pdf http://3d-printing-titanium.com/titanium-3d-printer-everything-you-need-to-know/


Additive Manufacturing 3D Printers: Why an Oxygen Analyzer May be Required

For the average person, Argon gas is not a topic of daily conversation, or, for that matter, any conversation, ever. It may be surprising to learn that argon is the third most common gas in the earth’s atmosphere, though most people know little about it. The word argon itself comes from a Greek word meaning ‘inactive’ because of its lack of chemical reactions. Argon is colorless, odorless, tasteless, and non-toxic, but this doesn’t mean it is completely harmless. Because it is 38% denser than air, it can displace the oxygen in an enclosed area.

One of the most modern uses of argon gas is in selective laser melting (SLM), which is a type of 3D printing. The first process in additive manufacturing requires the printing chamber be vacuumed of all oxygen. After oxygen has been removed, argon is then backfilled or released back into chamber to reduce oxygen to 500ppm or less. The oxygen analyzer (0-1000ppm oxygen range) has a sensor inside the printing chamber, monitoring oxygen while the machine is in operation.

In this process of additive manufacturing or AM, layers of a powder are then bonded together using a powerful laser (as opposed to sinter bonding them). Argon is an inert gas, and relatively inexpensive, therefore it creates the perfect environment for this process to take place in. The use of argon here permits a tightly controlled atmosphere, allowing for an oxygen free environment. Using this amount of argon requires the use of an oxygen analyzer for control.

When using the right safety precautions, like an oxygen analyzer, argon can be very useful. It is used as a shielding gas in metal printing and direct laser sintering manufacturing (DLSM) to prevent corrosion, and can even be used to reduce oxidation.

An oxygen analyzers tests the ppm of oxygen in an enclosed area to ensure it is safe begin selective laser sintering process. If a gas like argon were to leak, it would push breathable oxygen out as it filled the room displacing any breathable air. Having no color or odor, a person in the room would be unaware of this exchange of gasses until it was too late. Also, having an oxygen monitor, like ones sold by PureAire Monitoring Systems, would alert anyone around of a gas leak in time for them to seek safety.

If you are interested in using argon gas, and require an O2 analyzer contact PureAire Monitoring Systems to learn about how easy it can be to stay safe with an oxygen monitor. Argon has an important place in our modern world, so spread the word and share the knowledge of how to use argon while practicing safety.

For a reliable oxygen analyzer, look to PureAire, a company with over 15 years of experience in the field. Learn more about PureAire's products at www.pureairemonitoring.com.




Air Separation Plants and the Use of Oxygen Monitors

Air separation plants are critical for many different industries, from clean energy to manufacturing. Nowadays, cryogenic is the most common type of distillation used to separate air into its component gases - nitrogen, oxygen, and inert gases including helium and argon. If your industry relies on air separation for product development or manufacturing, then knowing how the process works is an important part of operational safety. Learn about air separation plant operation and safety protocol to be informed.

How Air Separation Plants Work

In the cryogenic air separation process, air is chilled to the liquid stage. At this point, nitrogen and oxygen can be separated out from the inert gases in the air. Each compound can then be distilled at boiling temperature, thereby returning the liquid to a vapor state. The resulting nitrogen and oxygen gases are highly pure.

To get the air ready to be separated, plant employees first filter the air to remove particles, such as dust. Next, the air is pressurized and then filtered up to several times to remove carbon dioxide, which can freeze the distilling equipment.

Using a still and heat exchanger, workers heat and cool the gas, turning it into a highly pure liquid. The oxygen liquefies and falls to the bottom, while the highly pure nitrogen gas floats above the oxygen since it is lighter.

Once separated, the gases can be kept in gaseous state or returned to a liquid state via chilling. Many air separation plants have elaborate pipe systems, whereby the oxygen or nitrogen gas can be transported directly to production lines.

Air separation plants have many diverse uses. Pure oxygen gas is a basic component of metalwork including steel manufacturing. Nitrogen gas helps preserve edible oils from oxidizing and is used as a safeguard against combustion in shipping and cargo transit.

The cryogenic process is effective and efficient at separating air; however, it does pose some safety risks. Air is safe to breathe when nitrogen and oxygen are together in the appropriate ratio. As nitrogen and oxygen are separated two distinct hazards emerge.

Pure oxygen increases the fire danger in an environment. If not controlled, this could turn dangerous.

Pure nitrogen depletes oxygen and can cause death via asphyxiation. Since nitrogen is colorless and odorless, workers may not know if the distilled nitrogen has escaped the still and infiltrated the environment. Argon acts in a similar manner, yet is a less common hazard since it is present in trace levels in oxygen.

Without a safeguard of an oxygen monitor, staff may be exposed to toxic gases. In a worst-case scenario, staff could die.

How an Oxygen Monitor Protects Staff

Between 1992 and 2002, 80 workers died from nitrogen exposure. Workers may fall unconscious after even a single breath of oxygen deficient air. If individuals do not receive oxygen in a matter of minutes, the consequences are grave.

Educating staff about the dangers of these gases is a first step toward operational safety. Installing an oxygen or O2 monitor is the next step to keeping everyone safe.

An O2 monitor measures the levels of oxygen in the air at any given time. The device takes sample readings of the air and remains silent as long as there is sufficient oxygen in the environment. Since argon and nitrogen deplete oxygen, the level of oxygen in the room will decrease if a gas leak occurs. When oxygen levels fall below the minimum safety level, the O2 detector will sound an alarm. Trained staff will then know to evacuate the premises until emergency assistance arrives.

Oxygen deficiency monitors from PureAire are guaranteed to perform for 10 years. These oxygen deficiency monitors have a zirconium oxide sensor, which accurately measures air oxygen levels in temperatures as low as -40 Celsius. The O2 monitor from PureAire is an efficient, cost-effective way for plants using nitrogen, helium, or argon to keep staff safe from the known health hazards of these gases.

If you seek an oxygen monitor that needs no maintenance, no calibration, and is guaranteed to last, you may be interested in PureAire's line of products. Learn more at www.pureairemonitoring.com or by emailing info@pureaire.net for more information.




Chlorine Safety and Prevention: How to Protect Yourself from Chlorine Leaks

While chlorine gas is widely used in swimming pools, water treatment facilities, cleaning products, pharmaceutical products, and in many other industries, the gas is highly toxic when handled improperly. Training your workers on how to safely use chlorine is one part of health and safety best practices; monitoring your workplace for chlorine leaks is another. Learn about the hidden dangers in this common substance and how you can stay safe.

The "Hidden Dangers" of Chlorine

So many everyday things that you see and touch have come into contact with chlorine. The substance is a common cleaner and disinfectant because it is easy to use and inexpensive. Chlorine is also used in agricultural pesticides, in the manufacturing of drugs, in wastewater treatment facilities and the sanitizing of everyday drinking water, in paper manufacturing, in hospitality swimming pools and spas, and in many other products. No matter where it is being used, chlorine must be properly handled by all staff at all times.

At room temperature, high chlorine levels are toxic. If chlorine gas comes into contact with substances including ammonia, ether, hydrogen, and turpentine, it can combust. Since this gas can cause breathing problems, it is dangerous to individuals with respiratory problems including asthma.

The gas is yellowish at room temperature and has a distinct odor, so staff will be able to see and smell the substance. While this does aid in awareness of chlorine leaks, it is not sufficient to trust that your staff will see or smell leaked chlorine and leave.

Employees exposed to chlorine can experience eye damage, coughing, choking, frostbite on the skin, and respiratory problems. In a worst case scenario, staff can die from suffocation due to sustained chlorine exposure.

Fortunately, fixed gas monitors are an efficient way to protect staff from a chlorine leak.

How PureAire Universal Gas Detectors Protect You From Chlorine Leaks

At PureAire, we offer universal gas monitors that protect against chlorine and other gases. PureAire's universal gas detectors are compact and designed for wall mounting in areas where you store or work with gases. Once installed, these detectors continually performs gas detection and monitoring. The maximum acceptable level of chlorine that workers can be exposed to, per OSHA regulations, is 1.0 parts per million (ppm). Chlorine is considered to be "Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health" when levels reach 10 ppm. As long as levels of chlorine remain below the acceptable safe level of 1.0 ppm, the detector is silent. Yet if gas leaks out and levels rise above the maximum acceptable level, the PureAire gas detector will sound an alert and flash a light so that staff will see or hear the alarm.

Staff can then have enough time to stop what they are doing, exit the premises, and wait for emergency responders to contain the chlorine leak. When staff are alerted as soon as levels exceed those deemed safe, they can get out of the building before succumbing to chlorine-related health hazards.

The universal gas monitor from PureAire protects against toxic gases including chlorine, hydrogen chlorine, ammonia, hydrogen fluoride, and other gases. Once installed, the PureAire detector will last for more than seven years without requiring any maintenance. If you seek a safe solution that delivers peace of mind and effective protection from chlorine leaks, PureAire's fixed gas monitor is a cost-effective, reliable option.

Capable of chlorine gas detection in temperatures as low as -25 Fahrenheit up to to 22 Fahrenheit (-32 C to 50 C), these gas detectors offer flexible gas monitoring for visible and invisible toxins. PureAire's universal gas monitor is also water resistant and capable of detecting gases within a 30-foot range.

Since PureAire's detectors have such a long lifespan, they are a convenient way to address gas leaks in the workplace. An optional long life renewable sensor extends the lifespan of these gas monitors by recharging the battery.

After you install the gas monitor, your staff can work with chlorine and other gases with the certainty of knowing that their safety is protected. To protect your workers and your business assets, look to PureAire. View their fixed gas monitor or learn more at http://www.pureairemonitoring.com.




PureAire Universal Gas Detector Offers Protection Against Toxic Levels of Ammonia

In March of 2016, an ammonia gas leak at a seafood processing plant in Boston left one worker dead. The fumes at the plant were so powerful that firefighters could not promptly enter the scene to mitigate the gas leak and try to save the staff member until much later. Reports show that 5,300 pounds of ammonia gas leaked out of the plant. If you work with ammonia at your facility, learn why this gas is so dangerous and one simple thing that you can do to prevent a tragedy like this from affecting your workers.

The Hidden Dangers of Ammonia

Ammonia is commonly used in refrigeration of dairy, meat, food processing, and cold storage. In fact, almost everything you can buy at your local grocery store has passed through an ammonia refrigeration site before making its way to your local store.

A mixture of nitrogen and hydrogen, ammonia has been used in refrigeration since the 1800's. It is energy-efficient, inexpensive, more environmentally friendly than chlorofluorocarbon (Freon) refrigerant, and widely available via commercial manufacturing. While it may have started off as a refrigerant of food, ammonia is also used today for ice and water chilling in office buildings. In Europe, ammonia has additional applications in air conditioners in public buildings including hospitals and airports. The substance is also used in industries as diverse as semiconductor manufacturing, environmental emission monitoring, agricultural fertilizer, and chemical manufacturing.

As useful as ammonia is, it is also a dangerous substance when not properly stored. It can combust at high heat. While colorless, ammonia gas has a noxious odor.

When workers are exposed to ammonia gas, they can experience skin and eye irritation. If concentrations of ammonia are high, burning and injury can result. In some cases permanent eye damage or blindness can occur.

Workers will immediately know they are exposed to a harmful substance from symptoms including respiratory and nasal burning. Even though staff have a warning due to ammonia's odor, the substance causes adaptation. Workers may perceive a slight ammonia odor at low levels of exposure, and adjust to the scent so they can't tell when concentration has surpassed acceptable levels.

In a worst case scenario, those exposed to ammonia will experience respiratory failure and die. The good news is, there are ways to protect staff from ammonia exposure using universal gas detection tools.

How PureAire Universal Gas Detectors Protect Staff from Ammonia Exposure

PureAire's universal gas monitors protect against not only ammonia, but bromine, chlorine, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, hydrides and other gases. Once installed, the monitor continually checks levels of gases and provides a visual and aural alert if levels of any substance exceed safe levels.

This is a simple solution for round the clock gas monitoring for ammonia and many other hazardous gases. While ammonia has an odor, many other dangerous gases do not. Gas monitoring protects workers against substances they can smell as well as "silent killers" they cannot see or smell. With a universal gas monitor installed, workers can perform their duties secure in the knowledge that they will be alerted if ammonia or another substance leaks into the environment.

After installation, the universal gas detector will work for over seven years with no maintenance. PureAire's gas monitor are built to outlast the competition to provide improved peace of mind for management and staff.

If an ammonia leak were to happen, the gas monitor would sound an alarm so that workers can safely evacuate before succumbing to respiratory damage or failure. With staff outside the premises, everyone is thereby safe until first responders can deal with the leak. For example, in the Boston incident, the worker would have been able to escape the seafood plant with his life, resulting in an ammonia leak with no fatalities.

Not only is gas detection the right thing to do for peace of mind, it can safeguard your business assets and personnel from dangers. To learn more about PureAire's line of universal gas detectors, please visit http://www.pureairemonitoring.com.

Source http://www.bostonherald.com/news/local_coverage/2016/03/worker_dies_in_ammonia_leak_at_plant_in_seaport https://www.health.ny.gov/environmental/emergency/chemical_terrorism/ammonia_tech.htm


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE -

PureAire Universal Gas Monitor Receives UL Listing

PureAire is pleased to announce that its PureAire Universal Gas Monitor received the UL/CUL listing for models 99030 and 99031. PureAire’s Universal monitors comply with national and international safety standards, including UL 61010-1, CSA C22.2 NO. 61010-1-12-CAN/CSA, and IEC/EN 31010-1.

Designed to protect against toxic gases including ammonia, bromine, chlorine, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, hydrides and other gases, the universal gas monitor from PureAire offers continuous monitoring against unsafe gas levels. A universal gas monitor provides an easy and cost-effective solution for consistent monitoring for those organizations that need to work with these potentially toxic gases, yet wish to safeguard their workers.

PureAire universal gas monitors are recommended for settings as diverse as cold food storage, chemical plants, semiconductors, manufacturing plants, pharmaceutical operations, and laboratory settings. PureAire's line of universal gas monitors allow facilities to work with these gases in a safe and responsible manner. The renewable sensor lasts for more than 7 years, longer than those of competitors. A built-in alarm sounds when gases surpass safe levels, allowing workers to take notice even when they cannot otherwise see, smell, or taste the gases. PureAire's universal gas monitors also have a 4-20 mA signal and 2 user-selectable relays, which can signal external horns, strobes, or fans.

About PureAire

PureAire, which was founded in 1997, offers a line of oxygen monitoring devices and universal gas monitors for use in commercial, retail, educational, laboratory, and other settings. PureAire's line of universal gas monitors have sensors guaranteed to last for 7 years without maintenance, offering superior performance and reliability. The universal gas monitors run on a UL listed 24 VDC power supply. To learn more about PureAire or view their line of universal gas monitors, please visit www.pureairemonitoring.com.




Fertility Clinics and Egg Freezing: Nitrogen Use and How to Remain Safe

For women who want to have children when the time is right, egg freezing is a viable option and one that has become more popular in recent years. As an abundance of fertility clinics pop up nationwide, it is important to consider the safety implications of IVF, egg freezing, and fertility clinics. Dive into the world of fertility clinics to understand how eggs remain viable -- sometimes for years after harvesting -- and what risks the environment holds.

How Do Fertility Clinics Harvest and Store Eggs?

During the monthly menstrual cycle, women release a viable egg. In the fertility harvesting process, IVF clinicians administer hormones that increase egg production so they can harvest and store multiple eggs in a one-time procedure.

Doctors first administer hormone injections to inflate egg production prior to harvesting and storage. Three days after the final injection, the eggs are ready for harvesting. At this point, female patients then have eggs harvested from their ovaries using needles. Now the patient's role is simply to leave the eggs at the IVF facility until she wishes to be inseminated.

Traditionally, eggs were frozen for long-term storage, then thawed out when patients wanted to use the eggs. This method worked, but had a suboptimal success rate during IVF.

A new method, termed vitrification, increases the success rate of egg freezing for in vitro fertilization. Vitrification uses a flash freezing process to quickly freeze the eggs for long-term storage. After the eggs have frozen, they are then stored inside tanks of liquid nitrogen until they are needed. The new method reduces the formation of ice crystals, which can damage the egg during the thawing out.

The main risk that doctors counsel patients on is the chance that some or all of the eggs will perish in the process. Freezing of eggs is still a relatively new procedure. However, there is a greater risk involved. One that could affect female patients, their eggs, and fertility clinic staff: The risk of liquid nitrogen exposure.

Nitrogen Warnings in the Fertility Clinic Setting

Liquid nitrogen is perfectly safe as long as it remains in storage tanks. If even a single tank were to develop a leak, and the substance were to spill out into the fertility clinic, a lot more would be at stake than the viability of stored eggs for in vitro fertilization.

Nitrogen has the potential to deplete oxygen from an environment. At first, this may cause discomfort, dizziness, or confusion. As the leak continues and displaces more oxygen from the room, staff can asphyxiate. Since the gas cannot be seen or smelled, employees will not know something is wrong until it is too late and lives are lost.

For the safety of clinic staff, an oxygen deficiency monitor can be installed near the liquid nitrogen tank. This monitor takes periodic readings of the oxygen levels in the room. When everything is working properly and the oxygen is within the normal range, the monitor remains silent yet vigilant. In a worst case scenario where a nitrogen leak does develop, the O2 monitor will sound an alert once the oxygen in the room falls below acceptable levels. The alarm gives staff enough notice to escape the premises before being overcome by the lack of oxygen.

Like a carbon monoxide detector, an oxygen deficiency monitor does not really do anything until something goes wrong but can save lives in the event of an emergency. As with a carbon monoxide detector, it is important to select and install a quality O2 monitor.

The latest generation of oxygen monitors from PureAire come with a zirconium sensor, which requires no calibration or maintenance. Staff can install the O2 monitor in the IVF facility and remain assured that it will work for a period of 10 years with no maintenance of any kind.

For a reliable oxygen deficiency monitor, look to PureAire, a company with over 15 years of experience in the field. Learn more about PureAire's products at www.pureairemonitoring.com.




Nitrogen Generators: Where are they Installed and How to Stay Safe?

Used in a range of industries, nitrogen generators ensure a steady supply of 99.5% pure, commercially sterile nitrogen from a compressed air storage tank. From an industrial standpoint, nitrogen generators are seen as preferable to cylinders of nitrogen as they are more reliable, more compact, and easy to use and install. However, these generators are not without risk. Learn about nitrogen generator installation best practices and how to stay safe when using these devices in your facility.

Where are Nitrogen Generators Installed?

Since nitrogen generators have such a wide array of end use cases, they wind up getting installed in different commercial environments. Nitrogen generators may exist in:

  • Brewing operations - To sparge and mix the wort
  • Food processing and packaging plants - In the food packaging process
  • Industry - To test and clean tanks and vessels
  • Engineering facilities - For use in manufacturing, testing, and product development
  • Automotive plants - In paint booths

These generators offer a steady supply of nitrogen at a lower cost than using gas cylinders. One generator takes up less room than several cylinders, saving floor space where it is needed most. A generator is easy to install and simpler for employees to use (since it requires less maintenance) than cylinders, so many manufacturers have switched from using cylinders of nitrogen to using generators.

Nitrogen generators are most often operated indoors, as these typical use cases show. In the event of a leak or other problem with the generator, escaping gas has nowhere to go other than inside the building. In some cases, the building may be set up so that nitrogen generators vent to the outside, thus offering a buffer from the harmful gas; however, it is not always possible to vent the generator to plain air.

That said, these units do post a risk. Nitrogen is a colorless, odorless gas that creates an oxygen deficient state. If the generator were to develop a leak, nitrogen gas could leak out undetected into the work environment. In a matter of minutes, nitrogen gas from a leaking tank can deplete the workspace of oxygen. To protect the health of your employees, it is necessary to only use nitrogen generators in conjunction with an oxygen monitor, which alerts staff to low levels of oxygen.

Why You Need an Oxygen Monitor With Nitrogen Generators

An O2 monitor, or oxygen monitor, continually monitors the level of oxygen in the room. When there is enough oxygen, the detector stays silent. A normal oxygen value is 21 percent by volume. If something unexpected happens -- such as a nitrogen leak -- and the amount of oxygen in the room begins to fall, the monitor sounds an alarm and flashes to grab staff attention. This way, staff have advance knowledge and can leave the work space before oxygen levels fall too low.

Oxygen monitors can alert staff if levels fall too low (19.5 percent or less) or too high (23.5 percent or above). Low levels of oxygen pose a severe health hazard for individuals, while high levels of oxygen pose a fire and combustion hazard.

Without an O2 monitor in place, staff would have no knowledge of a nitrogen problem until it was too late. When oxygen levels fall below the acceptable threshold, staff can become disoriented and fatigued, while succumbing to a euphoria that can dissuade them from noticing that something has gone wrong. Loss of coordination and mental processing skills, followed by poor judgment, vomiting, nausea, and eventually death by asphyxiation as oxygen levels continue to fall.

An additional consideration for large facilities is that nitrogen gas is often used far from the actual location of the generator. Thus, even if the generator you have purchased comes with an O2 monitor of its own, the monitor may not be able to test working conditions where the nitrogen is actually in use. A facility may need multiple oxygen monitors to make sure that all areas where nitrogen gas is used have acceptable air quality.

PureAire offers O2 monitors that work in conjunction with nitrogen generators. PureAire's line of oxygen detectors rely on zirconium sensors, which are guaranteed to work for at least 10 years without calibration. When it comes to protecting your staff, it's the wise choice. Explore PureAire's lineup of oxygen detectors at http://www.pureairemonitoring.com.


The Hidden Dangers and Facts of Cryotherapy: How to Remain Safe and Get Health benefits too

While cryotherapy or frost therapy has been used for millennia, the new cryotherapy center fad that's become popular in salon culture has come under scrutiny when a 24-year-old woman who worked at a cryohealth center in Las Vegas was found dead after using a cryo chamber at work. Learn more about cryotherapy, what it claims to do for the body, and whether or not it can be safely used. 

The Health Benefits of Cryotherapy

Advocates claim that there are many benefits of cryotherapy and that the treatment is highly safe when it is properly performed. The type of whole body cryotherapy in use at cryohealth centers today was developed in 1978 as a rheumatoid arthritis treatment. While this treatment is often covered by health insurance in other nations, the U.S.healthcare industry does not recognize cryotherapy for insurance purposes or much regulate the field. 

Unlike immersion in an ice bath, the chill of cryotherapy is dry so it does not feel uncomfortable, like submersion in an ice bath would. Exposure to chilled air can treat sports injuries, muscle soreness, joint pain, pain and inflammation associated with health conditions like arthritis or fibromyalgia, and immune function. Some even claim that cryotherapy can help with weight loss or delay the aging process. 

Is Cryotherapy Safe? 

Individuals with certain health conditions -- including hypertension, heart disease, seizures, anemia, pregnancy, and claustrophobia -- should not use cryotherapy. For other individuals, cryotherapy has generally been considered safe. Some individuals may experience redness or skin irritation, an allergic reaction to the cold, frostbite, or skin burns. 

If the individual stays in the cryotherapy chamber longer than recommended, or the facility does not take the proper precautions, health risks increase. Typically, people are only supposed to expose themselves to the cold temperatures in the cryo chamber for two to three minutes. The salon where the woman died was apparently selling 30-minute sessions, the New York Post reports. 30 minutes is too long to spend in frigid temperatures. 

In the case of the employee who died in a cryotherapy chamber, no one apparently knew the woman was in there since she went in alone after work. Most cryotherapy chambers only allow people to use the facility when someone is onsite monitoring them as a first line safety precaution. 

Even if the employee did not follow proper procedures in entering the cryo chamber, her death raised awareness of hidden dangers in this unregulated industry. People want to know whether this popular treatment is safe for them. The salon where the woman died was not licensed with the State of Nevada. 

Safety Measures for Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy can be safe when performed by a licensed facility that has safeguards in place to make sure that those undergoing treatment do not stay in too long, do not get overlooked, and are not exposed to environmental hazards. 

One reliable way to monitor the environment of the cryo chamber is to use an oxygen monitor or oxygen deficiency monitor. An oxygen deficiency monitor continuously measures the amount of oxygen in the environment and sets off an alarm if oxygen falls below a safe level. 

Cryohealth chambers use a form of nitrogen to create a dry frost and chill the chamber. Nitrogen, when used in high doses, creates an oxygen deficient environment. In a worst-case scenario, the room could become so oxygen deficient that anyone inside could suffocate to death. 

Since nitrogen does not have an odor or a color, individuals cannot see it. When a cryohealth chamber is equipped with an oxygen monitor, the air inside will not fall below safe levels without first alerting staff to the drop in oxygen. Staff can then assist any patients in evacuating the cryotherapy chamber before something bad happens.  

PureAire offers O2 monitors that are made with zirconium sensors, which are guaranteed to last for at least 10 years and hold up equally well in humid and dry environments. Once the facility sets up O2 monitors in every cryo chamber, staff can rest assured that the monitors will alert them to any sudden change in oxygen levels with enough time to get people outside of the chamber before something bad happens. 

When a facility uses oxygen monitors inside the chambers, has a license from the State, and ensures that staff monitor the chambers during treatments, cryotherapy can be performed safely. 

To learn more about PureAire's line of oxygen deficiency monitors, visit www.pureairemonitoring.com.

Additive Manufacturing 3D Printing: The Growth Progress and Need for Safety Monitors

3D printing is officially skyrocketing, with industrial applications in medical, biotech, aerospace, defense, and consumer electronics industries growing daily. At the heart of this acceleration is the additive manufacturing or AM process, which allows for easy printing from computer-aided design templates. As this new technology reaches its tipping point, review what the growth process says about the safety of 3D printing. 

3D Printing: Additive Manufacturing at a Tipping Point

No longer solely the terrain of artists and inventors making one-off products, 3D printing is finally going mainstream: Major companies including GE, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, NASA and Google have adopted 3D printing as of 2014. This widespread adoption heralds the move of 3D printing away from niche technology and toward a mainstream staple of next-generation manufacturing.

In the 3D printing process, the printer deposits layers one at a time, essentially building up the prototype before bonds the layers together. In the laser sintering process, a special laser melts and fuses the layers together, to bring the design to life. Because employees can make changes to the prototype between items, it is relatively easy to make changes to the item color, size, or shape from one printed item to the next. This makes it possible for individual medical devices or accessories to be printed from a select stock of computer-aided design (CAD) templates. 

Major companies like those mentioned above can afford to make the investment in 3D printing and AM because they have the funds to purchase the costly equipment needed for the initial foray. While 3D printers have become more widespread, they are not cheap. Compared with other types of manufacturing, it costs a lot to make something like an airplane part or a dental device using 3D printing over traditional printing. 

However, the initial expenses in 3D printing represents the peak costs to the business. After the device or the part is perfected, the company can utilize the same equipment and printing patterns to effectively mass produce the unit. Aside from ongoing expenses for printing supplies, the cost to produce subsequent parts is quite low. 

The competitive advantage of being able to offer something like a personalized medical device is well worth the initial cost of 3D printing. As printable materials continue to expand, more companies will invest in 3D printing to develop niche-appropriate custom products and solutions. This is not without its dangers to the business and its employees. Protect yourself by learning more.  

The Hidden Dangers of 3D Printing

While it may seem like a safe process -- and, indeed, the end result is quite safe -- 3D printing does utilize some potentially dangerous materials. Argon gas is particularly common in certain types of 3D printing. In the printing process, the 3D printer deposits thin layers of powder to effectively build the form that is being produced. The argon gas allows the different layers of powder to fuse together during the laser sintering, bringing the product to life in three dimensions. 

Argon is relatively inexpensive and highly effective at this task, which accounts for its widespread use in this new niche. However, argon is also a dense gas that is naturally heavier than oxygen. Were argon to escape from the 3D printing environment and enter the workshop or manufacturing floor, it would deplete the oxygen in the room. Any staff working there would thus face death by asphyxiation. Since argon is colorless and odorless, there is no easy way for staff to tell there is a problem. 

As 3D printing becomes more widespread, businesses must take the appropriate safety measures to ensure a safe working environment. They must inspect printing equipment to ensure that it is functioning properly and argon will remain contained in the printer. They must also introduce safeguards to protect staff in case of a malfunction. 

One simple and cost-effective solution is to install an oxygen monitor, which is also known as an O2 monitor. This type of sensor continually monitors the levels of oxygen in the room. If oxygen levels falls below the critical safety levels, such that employee health would be threatened, the oxygen monitor sounds an alarm to alert staff to the health threat. Staff can then evacuate immediately, and appropriate measures can be taken to secure the workplace environment and protect the printing technology.

PureAire offers sophisticated O2 monitors, which use a 10+ year no calibration sensor to offer durable everyday protection. PureAire's sensors are the perfect choice for 3D printing environment protection. To learn more about PureAire's lineup of oxygen monitor for argon gas detection, please visit http://www.pureaire.net or email us at info@pureaire.net.

Source:

https://hbr.org/2015/05/the-3-d-printing-revolution
http://www.pureairemonitoring.com/argon-gas-3d-printing-stay-safe/

CO2 Monitor For Breweries: Carbon Dioxide Safety and How to Stay Safe

Carbon dioxide is a necessary byproduct of the brewing process, yet too much CO2 can be dangerous to employee health. In Germany, two workers died at the same brewery in 2012 due to hazardous levels of CO2 present in beer mixing and pressure tanks. Learn more about how CO2 levels can get out of control during the beer brewing process and ways to protect your staff from this deadly gas. 

Carbon Dioxide in Brewing

As beer ferments in stainless steel fermentation tanks, the yeast that was pitched into the wort eats up the natural sugars (glucose) over the course of 14 days or more. Lagers have a longer fermentation period of up to 6 weeks. During this time, the beer is held in a pressurized tank and kept at a constant temperature. As the yeast consumes the sugars, it creates carbon dioxide gas and ethyl alcohol. The alcohol-free wort then becomes both carbonated and alcoholic, essentially turning into beer as we know it. 

Some carbon dioxide gas escapes the fermenter through an airlock during the initial fermentation period. However, as the beer finishes fermentation and reaches its final specific gravity (a measure of alcohol by volume), the airlock is capped and CO2 is then allowed to build up inside the tank. This ensures that beer becomes carbonated and develops the fizzy mouth feel you've come to associate with beer. Additional carbon dioxide can be added to the beer as needed to control the end result and ensure consistency in commercial brewing. 

Hazards of Carbon Dioxide

While carbon dioxide is crucial to the taste and feel of beer, it is also highly dangerous. CO2 displaces oxygen, which can lead to asphyxiation if the oxygen deficiency is not corrected. CO2 can also be highly toxic, even at levels as low as 0.5%. Exposure to more than 10% by volume of carbon dioxide can cause death within minutes. By the time a fellow staff member realizes that a colleague is non-responsive or has been overcome by exposure, the damage is done. 

Brewers must control their exposure to CO2 through all aspects of the beer brewing process, from fermentation to packaging and bottling. CO2 is heavier than air, so it will settle to the bottom of fermentation tanks. The gas can then escape from fermentation tanks and hide on the brewery floor, in invisible and dangerous pockets of air. 

Since carbon dioxide gas is odorless and colorless, brewery workers may not know when they are being exposed to dangerous levels of CO2 until it's too late. Even if staff are trained in the best practices regarding carbon dioxide in the environment, they cannot protect themselves from something they cannot see or smell. 

To keep staff safe, it's a smart idea to monitor levels of carbon dioxide in the air. A dual-use oxygen/carbon dioxide sensor can monitor existing levels of CO2 and alert staff if the amount of CO2 start to rise. This monitor can also track the level of oxygen, sounding an alarm if oxygen levels fall to a point where staff do not have enough oxygen to breathe.

When levels of CO2 reach the point that can be hazardous to health or exceed the minimum exposure risk, or when the amount of oxygen in the air becomes too low, visual and auditory alarms go of that alert all staff on the brewery floor to the dangers. Staff can then evacuate the premises safely.  These monitors take readings of the levels of O2 and CO2 in the environment at all times. If levels become too high, brewery staff can remove carbon dioxide from the environment by using the ring main or manually removing the CO2. 

PureAire offers a dual O2/CO2 monitor that has a zirconium sensor, which is uniquely equipped to perform in humid environments where temperatures fluctuate. The same Co2 detector can last for up to 10 years, and will not require significant maintenance or calibration to remain accurate. Compared to other brewery CO2 monitor offerings, PureAire's are accurate, durable, reliable, and easy to use.  As a leading expert in the area of carbon dioxide monitoring, PureAire has more than 15 years of experience creating durable oxygen deficiency monitors. Learn more about the PureAire Oxygen Monitoring System by emailing info@pureaire.net or visiting the business website, www.pureairemonitoring.com. Source.


Ice Cream Freezing Using Nitrogen: How to Stay Safe while using Nitrogen

Liquid nitrogen is a powerful and potentially dangerous form of nitrogen that freezes the water content of food and beverages within seconds. Ice cream manufacturers have developed new efficiencies in the ice cream freezing process by adopting liquid nitrogen to improve the workflow and quality of the finished product. Unfortunately, liquid nitrogen can actually be dangerous if it is not handled properly. If some of the nitrogen remains in the product either as a gas or as a liquid, it can cause serious internal damage.

The risks of working with liquid nitrogen

In addition to its popularity in the ice cream manufacturing business, liquid nitrogen has become a popular tool in high-end restaurants and bars. Chefs and bartenders use the substance to flash-freeze items and create a unique display of fog as the liquid nitrogen is exposed to air. When everything works properly, the liquid nitrogen is not a hazard. However, the substance can cause significant harm if it is not properly handled in the kitchen, or if some of the liquid nitrogen escapes into the atmosphere and turns to gas. As the BBC reported, a British teen had to have her stomach removed after she drank a cocktail that contained liquid nitrogen, and a lab worker died of asphyxiation after a liquid nitrogen spill in the lab.

Liquid nitrogen is colorless, tasteless and odorless. It is also extremely cold, with a temperature of -321 degrees Fahrenheit. If your workers accidentally get liquid nitrogen on their skin while manufacturing ice cream, they will suffer severe burns. If some amount of the nitrogen remains in the finished product, and customers actually eat the ice cream, it can cause esophageal and stomach tissue to freeze. This is extremely painful and highly dangerous.

Controlling liquid nitrogen in the manufacturing process

Now that we've explained some of the risks of liquid nitrogen, we hope you are aware of the significant danger that it can pose to your staff and your reputation in the marketplace. Luckily, there are safeguards in the process that can make sure your staff are not unduly exposed to liquid nitrogen, spills are noted before they can cause damage, and no trace of liquid nitrogen remains in the final product.

When nitrogen becomes loose in the atmosphere, it creates a state of oxygen deficiency. When there is not enough oxygen in the room, workers will not be able to comfortably breathe. If this continues, there will eventually not be enough oxygen for your workers and death by suffocation can occur. Since liquid nitrogen has no odor or color, workers may not notice its presence until it is too late.

That's where an oxygen sensor comes in. An oxygen sensor or O2 deficiency monitor is able to track the oxygen levels in the manufacturing plant at all times, even when temperatures fluctuate. The O2 deficiency monitor takes regular readings of the oxygen in the environment and notices if the oxygen level drops in the building. The sensor then notifies employees that there is a problem, giving staff enough time to evacuate the premises before anything bad can happen.

Oxygen deficiency monitors from PureAire use zirconium sensors. These perform well regardless of environment humidity and are guaranteed to last for 10 years or more. Compared to other types of O2 sensors, which are not able to last as long and require maintenance and calibration to continue to work, PureAire's sensors offer the unbeatable combination of reliability and performance.

A leading expert in oxygen deficiency monitoring, PureAire brings over 15 years of experience to bear in creating the industry's best oxygen deficiency monitors. Learn more about the PureAire Oxygen detector visiting the business website, www.pureairemonitoring.com.

o2 monitor, nitrogen ice cream, o2 monitor ice cream, oxygen deficiency monitor

PureAire O2 Monitor for Food Manufacturing Tunnel/Freezers with N2 and CO2: Using a 10 Year No Calibration Sensor

For flash freezing nothing beats a liquid nitrogen or carbon dioxide immersion or tunnel style freezer for efficiency, overall performance, and cost savings. If you haven't yet switched to an immersion freezer, doing so now could position you to better compete in your market segment and save money over time. Learn more about why these freezers are a must for frozen food manufacturers.

Immersion Freezers: How They Work

Ideal for freezing seafood, poultry, meat, and marinated or glazed products, these freezers use a conveyor belt to ferry food items through a liquid nitrogen or carbon dioxide bath. When the food is fully immersed in the gas, which is held at a steady temperature suitable for freezing food items, it freezes completely in seconds. This locks in nutrients, flavor, and texture to preserve the best qualities of the item.

Unit controls accommodate for fluctuations in the product load and variations in temperature of the incoming food items to enforce quality control every time. A turn up/turn down capability allows you to save money by moderating unit performance; the unique space-saving design and tunnel orientation reduces air infiltration and helps maintain best practices in unit sanitation.

By offering a better yield retention, a low capital investment, and lower operating costs, these units allow you to increase your production rates without increasing your staffing or your physical footprint. The immersion freezing system is customizable for a wide range of products and ensures the consistent quality in frozen foods you need.

These freezers run on inert gases, which deplete oxygen from the air. To protect workers and maintain safety, you must ensure that your freezer has an O2 monitoring system, which ensures that there is enough oxygen in the environment and alerts staff if the level of oxygen falls below the minimum safe level.

Why You Need an Oxygen Monitor For Your Immersion Freezer

If oxygen levels in the work environment get too low, staff working in the area may not have enough oxygen to breathe and could asphyxiate. PureAire's O2 monitors are capable of performing in sub-zero environments, where other oxygen sensors may fail to perform consistently.

The oxygen monitor keeps tabs on the amount of oxygen in the environment at all times. Even in a sensitive environment like the tunnel or immersion freezer, where the temperatures are constantly changing as food cycles off of and on to the conveyor belts, the oxygen monitor is able to provide a stable reading to ensure accuracy and protect your employees.

This oxygen deficiency monitor features a zirconium sensor, which is able to detect oxygen levels across the temperature spectrum and regardless of humidity. The oxygen monitor is guaranteed to perform accurately for a period of 10 years or more, without requiring the time-consuming maintenance that another oxygen detector might need. Additionally, you will not need to calibrate the oxygen monitor, as you would with other models. This offers an improvement over disposable sensors, which increase your bottom line and the amount of waste you produce.

When you switch to a tunnel or immersion freezer, you stand to boost your production capacity and your bottom line. Oxygen detectors from PureAire can help you save as much as $475 per year off our operating expenses while supporting your overall business growth.

With over 15 years of experience, PureAire is the industry's leading expert in oxygen monitoring. To learn more about the PureAire Oxygen Monitoring System, visit the company's website at www.Pureairemonitoring.com or email info@pureaire.net.


Argon Gas, 3D Printing, and How to Stay Safe

For the average person, Argon gas is not a topic of daily conversation, or, for that matter, any conversation, ever. It may be surprising to learn that argon is the third most common gas in the earth’s atmosphere, though most people know little about it. The word argon itself comes from a Greek word meaning ‘inactive’ because of its lack of chemical reactions. Argon is colorless, odorless, tasteless, and non-toxic, but this doesn’t mean it is completely harmless. Because it is 38% denser than air, it can displace the oxygen in an enclosed area, asphyxiating anyone inside.

When using the right safety precautions, like an oxygen deficiency monitor, argon can be very useful. It is used as a shielding gas in metal work and welding to prevent burning, and can even be used to extinguish fires. As a preservative, argon can be used to displace oxygen out of packaging to extend shelf life by preventing oxidation and spoilage. Even light bulbs are filled with argon to prevent oxidation of the filament.

One of the most modern uses of argon gas is in selective laser melting, which is a type of 3D printing. In this process of additive manufacturing, layers of a powder are bonded together using a powerful laser (as opposed to sinter bonding them). Argon is an inert gas, and relatively inexpensive, therefore it creates the perfect environment for this process to take place in. The use of argon here permits a tightly controlled atmosphere, allowing for an oxygen free environment. Using this amount of argon requires the use of an oxygen monitor for safety.

An oxygen deficiency monitor tests the percentage of oxygen in an enclosed area to ensure it is safe to breathe. If a gas like argon were to leak, it would push breathable oxygen out as it filled the room displacing any breathable air. Having no color or odor, a person in the room would be unaware of this exchange of gasses until it was too late. Having an oxygen monitor, like ones sold by PureAire Monitoring Systems, would alert anyone around of a gas leak in time for them to seek safety. If you are interested in using argon gas, contact PureAire Monitoring Systems to learn about how easy it can be to stay safe with an oxygen monitor. Argon has an important place in our modern world, so spread the word and share the knowledge of how to use argon while practicing safety.


Looking Hot while Staying Cool: Liquid Nitrogen at the Club

You feel the pulse of the music and the energy of the crowd around you. The beat is infectious and before you know it you are on the dance floor moving your body and having a good time. As the rhythm builds and your hips shake, one thing is holding you back and preventing you from fully enjoying the night. You are just too hot. You left your house looking like a million bucks and now you are a sweaty mess who is one song away from completely melting.

Seconds before you make the decision to escape the crowd and mop up your dripping face, a blast of cold air seemingly from the heavens sweeps across the club and sends a chill through your overheated body. You breathe in deeply and feel refreshed and alive, as you change your mind and stick it out to dance a while longer. You are happy just where you are, looking hot but feeling cool.

The cold blast you felt didn’t come from the heavens, but from a specifically designed and constructed cryogenic system created for the club. A quick blast of liquid nitrogen is all it takes to cool the crowd and have you feeling renewed. This liquid quickly dissipates into a gas, and, because it is denser therefore heavier than air, falls onto the dance floor and the sweaty people below.

Nitrogen is odorless, colorless, and tasteless, making it ideal for going unnoticed (other than a nice cool feeling). These qualities are also what can make it dangerous, because a room could fill with nitrogen without anybody noticing before it is too late. If the right safety precautions, like an oxygen deficiency monitor, are in place, you can party on in confidence. These monitors, like the ones sold by PureAire Monitoring Systems, make sure the oxygen level in the room is at a safe and breathable level, which changes as it is displaced with a heavier gas like nitrogen. If this occurs, an alarm will sound and you will be evacuated before anyone is harmed.

If you are looking for a cool a new experience, try attending a club with a liquid nitrogen system, but always remember, safety first. Check with the club and make sure they are using an oxygen monitor, and if they are not, have them contact PureAire Monitoring Systems to get hooked up.


Long Lasting Safety with PureAire Monitoring Systems’ 10+ year sensors

When it comes to oxygen deficiency monitors, PureAire makes the longest lasting units on the market.  They believe your safety should not be taken lightly, and have created a reliable and affordable monitor that will outlast all of their competitors.  PureAire Monitoring Systems has broken away from the norm of using disposable sensor cells, and has introduced the groundbreaking technology of a 10+ year maintenance free sensor.

Disposable sensor cells have been an international standard in oxygen monitors for decades, but they are far from ideal.  They require frequent maintenance and monthly to quarterly calibration, which can be costly.  Without calibration, false alarms will occur, or worse, a failure to alarm in the event of oxygen deficiency. The reliability of these disposable sensors can even be affected by changes in barometric pressure.

PureAire Monitoring Systems has come up with a unique product to solve these problems.  Their oxygen deficiency monitors include a Zirconium Oxide sensor, which lasts for 10+ years.  This sensor is not affected by barometric pressure, and never needs to be recalibrated. This means that it will continue working without flaw toward keeping you safe over many years.

With over 4,000 units in the field, PureAire’s oxygen deficiency monitors continue to gain popularity and support amongst its users.  No maintenance means no hassle, and more time to focus on your work while continuing to stay safe.

For more information on the PureAire Oxygen Monitor, contact PureAire Monitoring Systems, Inc., 557 Capital Drive, Lake Zurich, Illinois 60047; phone 888-788-8050, fax 847-726-6051, or contact us via contact form. You may also visit the company’s website at www.PureAireMonitoring.com, and www.MonitorOxygen.com.

About PureAire Monitoring Systems:

PureAire offers an unbeatable combination of innovation and experience in solving safety and environmental needs of their customers. As a manufacturer, they are capable of handling any size project, which includes working with OEMs and distributors.

PureAire’s proprietary sensor cell technology and leading edge electronics are designed to interface with the latest distributive control systems.

Beginning in 1996, their growth has been a result of their total commitment to supporting their customers. PureAire’s goal is to provide the best service and support in the industry. Safety is their number one priority. 

Cryotherapy is Cool

Cryotherapy is a real facet of medical treatment that uses extremely low temperatures to help with pain and inflammation.  Not to be confused with cryopreservation, in cryotherapy the patients are only subjected to the cold for minutes. It seems like something futuristic, but it is actually an increasingly common treatment among athletes to replace ice baths and ice pack therapies. 

More specifically, cryogenic chamber therapy, or Whole Body Cryotherapy (WBC), uses liquid nitrogen to cool a chamber to around -185oF.  The patient spends a few minutes in the chamber wearing only a bathing suit, socks, gloves and facial protection (to prevent frostbite), allowing the skin temperature to drop while the core body temperature remains stable.  This WBC treatment improves many types of muscle and joint pain and helps in the rehabilitation of injuries. 

These cryotherapy systems are currently being used by sports teams such as the San Antonio Spurs, the LA Clippers, and the Minnesota Timberwolves, just to name a few. Everyone from Olympians, to rugby players, to non-athletes looking for pain relief utilize WBC. The super cooling power of liquid nitrogen can be a blessing to those in pain, but precautions need to be taken to assure this tricky chemical remains safe.  In the event of a liquid nitrogen leak, the patient could suffocate from lack of breathable air.  This is why an Oxygen Deficiency Monitor is important to have in any facility that uses liquid nitrogen. 

PureAire Monitoring Systems provides a product that would be ideal for this type of application.  Their Oxygen Deficiency Monitor that uses a sample draw system is one of the best in the industry, and can be hooked into an alarm or horn and strobe to alert the chamber operator and patients in case of a leak.  The oxygen monitor can even be programmed to turn off the nitrogen tanks in the event of a leak in the system.

The O2 monitor would be situated outside the chamber. Through a tube, air samples from inside the chamber would be analyzed to make sure the oxygen level remains at a safe and breathable 20.9%.  Any nitrogen leak would reduce the percent of oxygen and trigger an alarm.  Because the oxygen deficiency monitor’s sensor lasts at least 10 years without maintenance, safety is guaranteed for many years to come.  Cryogenic chamber therapy has the potential to help many people treat their pain, and with the use of an oxygen monitor, they can do so safely.

Liquid Nitrogen in Human Oocyte Cryopreservation

The word cryopreservation sounds like something from a science fiction movie. Maybe a man from the past was frozen in time, only to reawaken decades later, unharmed and unaware that he had been frozen at all.  Though this scenario seems far-fetched, on a smaller scale, cryopreservation is a commonplace practice in the 21st century.  While a grown man cannot be frozen and awoken, the building blocks of man are fair game. 

Human oocyte cryopreservation, or egg freezing, is a way to freeze and preserve a woman’s eggs. At a later time, these eggs can be thawed and fertilized and used to impregnate the woman. There are many reasons a woman may be a candidate for this procedure.  Some of these reasons are age, early menopause, and pre chemotherapy or radiation therapy, which may damage eggs left in the body.  In any case, if a woman learns that she will be unable to produce healthy, viable eggs in her future, oocyte cryopreservation is a good option to ensure she has healthy eggs if she decides to try conceiving at a future time. 

Semen and embryos can also be treated and cryopreserved in a similar way.  These specimens can remain frozen for a long period of time.  Embryos can be stored for up to 16 years, and semen as long as 22 years.  This allows someone who is going through an illness or separation from a spouse to wait until a more viable time for implantation for conception.

Most people can easily understand the concept of freezing something to save for later, but the frozen eggs are not stored in your average icebox.  Instead, liquid nitrogen freezes the eggs at −321 Fareignheight. This temperature is considered a deep freeze. With the addition of a cryoprotectant to deter ice crystals from forming, the specimens remain in the deep freeze until they are thawed for later use.  Amazingly, over 500,000 live human births have been a result of such technologies. 

There are over 400 facilities nationwide that can provide the oocyte cryopreservation procedure to women in need.  On the patients end, the facilities seem like ordinary doctors offices, but the real magic takes place behind closed doors.  The scientists and lab technicians use liquid nitrogen to conduct the deep-freezing, which can be very toxic if not used correctly.  They rely on oxygen deficiency monitors to detect any lower than average levels of oxygen in the vicinity, which may indicate a nitrogen leak.  For the whole sequence to go off without a hitch, the scientists need to remain confident in their safety throughout the process.

Pureaire Oxygen Monitoring Systems has created the perfect product to ensure such safety.  Their O2 monitor is the best in the industry.  The zirconium oxide sensor in the monitor lasts 10+ years with no maintenance or recalibration, making the product last longer than any other. This makes the monitor very cost effective, as it does not require additional purchases on a yearly basis.  Also, the monitor’s ability to link to an alarm system, horn and strobe, and exhaust fan help warn people across a facility to evacuate an unsafe area. 

There is no question that today’s scientific technologies are impressive, yet ever evolving.  As a company, Pureaire Oxygen Monitoring Systems vows to support these growing technologies by keeping researchers safe and giving them the confidence to do their job creating families of the future.

For more information on the PureAire Oxygen Monitoring System, contact PureAire Monitoring Systems, Inc., 557 Capital Drive, Lake Zurich, IL 60047; phone 888-788-8050 or 847-726-6000; fax 847-726-6051; or email info@pureaire.net.  You may also visit the company’s website at www.Pureairemonitoring.com.


Helium and MRI Rooms Around the World

Helium gas is something most people feel fairly familiar with.  Children are enthralled with the magical beauty of a floating balloon, watching it reach toward the sky and hoping not to lose their grip on the string.  Helium feels safe, and while people surround themselves with flying wonders filled with this lightweight gas, the real magic of helium is taking place in MRI rooms across the globe.  With this magic, though, comes some danger. 

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) uses strong magnetic fields to surround the part of the body needing to be studied.  The resulting images are important for diagnosis and further understanding of a problem, but it is equally important that the procedure be safe and controlled.  In the process of using the MRI machine, the magnet becomes superheated, and this heat needs to be kept in check.  Liquid helium, at a temperature of  -450° F, surrounds the magnet and keeps it cool enough to remedy the danger of overheating, in turn posing its own risk. 

A Helium leak would displace the oxygen in a room, suffocating anyone inside.  Because it is colorless and odorless, an oxygen deficiency monitor is required for detection.  A person closed inside the room would not notice the leak on their own, and it would be too late.  In the event of a helium leak, an O2 monitor would sound at the first detection of oxygen displacement, warning anyone inside the room of the danger and allowing them to evacuate in plenty of time. 

Since the 1980’s, the number of MRI machines in use has risen from 12 to over 25,000.   This in turn makes MRI machines the #1 users of liquid helium in the world.  The relationship between the hot magnets and the cold helium is what makes the work of this important machine possible.  With the use of an oxygen deficiency monitor, doctors and patients at least have one less thing to worry about.  They can focus on the physical ailment at hand, and feel safe in knowing that in the event of a helium leak, they will be warned well before the point of suffocation.  

Oxygen Deficiency monitors are recommended in all MRI facilities, and are REQUIRED in all New York City MRI rooms.  PureAire Monitoring System’s oxygen monitors are a trusted product amongst MRI designers and users, thanks to their 10 + year oxygen sensor.  Unlike the competitors, PureAire’s sensors do not require maintenance or replacement parts and are not impacted by environmental drift.  This means no false alarms or failures due to depleted sensors. Without having a yearly service call on the monitor, the cost is very efficient.  This translates to prolonged safety without maintenance, and the safest and most reliable possible monitor for this application.

“Thanks again for your support. The oxygen monitors are in their respective locations and are functioning as designed. Nice unit! Everyone thinks they are a great product. The software menu is easy to use and could not be easier to operate.” - Dominion Nuclear

“The O2 monitors are working well and doing a great job!  Alarm relays are configured with the exhaust fan and is triggered a couple of times a day if we have cryogenic bottles in the area.  Excellent product, repeatable, and reliable as advertised.”  - Gulfstream Aerospace
For more information, please visit our web site at: www.PureAireMonitoring.com, or www.MonitorOxygen.com.

If you have any questions, we’d love to speak with you.  Call us at:  1-888-788-8050

About PureAire Monitoring Systems, Inc.
PureAire is the industry leader in gas monitoring solutions enabling organizations to ensure safe work environments, minimize compliance risk, and reduce associated costs. Over 1,000 organizations across the globe use PureAire gas monitoring solutions. Beginning in 1996, PureAire’s growth has been a result of an unbeatable combination of innovation and experience in solving safety and environmental needs for customers, as well as a total commitment to supporting the customer 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

1) Air Products. (1997). MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET. http://avogadro.chem.iastate.edu/MSDS/helium.pdf


PureAire Releases Universal Toxic Gas Monitor

PureAire Monitoring Systems manufactures and distributes toxic gas monitors for safety, and as of August 2013, releases new toxic gas monitor called the Universal Toxic Gas Monitor.  Their monitors make sure areas where toxic gases exist the area remains at a safe and breathable level, some gasses included are chlorine, bromine, HCL, HF, ammonia, toxics, and hydrides. These gases, commonly known as toxic gases, can be hazardous or even deadly if used without the proper safety precautions.  Typical areas where these gases are used include laboratories, pharmaceutical manufacturing plants, cryopreservation facilities, semiconductors, and cold food storage. The addition this product line insures PureAire’s products are the premium choice for your safety. 

Since their beginnings in 1997, PureAire has sold many thousands of toxic gas monitors to customers including (Northwestern University, Exxon Mobil, and NASA) and laboratories (Intel, Los Alamos National Labs, USDA).  A release of toxic gases in a confined space can cause irritation, permanent damage, and even hospitalization making it direly important that every space with human occupancy be monitored. Though these gases can be highly dangerous, their universal gas monitors allow groundbreaking research to be done with the ease of knowing any leak will be immediately detected.

PureAire Monitoring Systems provide the #1 universal toxic gas monitor in the industry. With a renewable sensor lasting 7+ years, no competitor can offer the same longevity or reliability. The universal gas monitor has a built in audible alarm, 2 user-selectable relays for signals to external fans/horns/strobes, and a 4-20 mA signal. 

The introduction of the universal gas monitor provides a newer easier solution for the customer. Still used is the STX-PA Smart Gas Transmitter, though PureAire is predicting the universal gas monitor will take the STX-PA’s place. Manufactured in the USA, there is no question they are the unparalleled company to go to for your toxic gas monitor safety needs. 

The STX-PA has been sold since PureAire started in 1997 along with there 4-20mA version Aircheck Lite, also trying to be replaced by the universal toxic monitor. As with most technology, a newer updated version of a product is necessary. While the universal monitor has many of the same functions as the STX-PA this product offers more. Integrated is software enabling the customer to change the sensors by a simple plug and play. If the customer has testing which requires using HF for a few days but needs to switch to chlorine for another experiment, he/she can simply unplug the HF sensor and replace with chlorine in matter of seconds. The STX-PA would also have capabilities of switching sensors, though sending in the monitor PureAire had to take place in order to switch.

In addition to many more features listed for the universal monitor, now there is a considerable louder 90 dB audible alarm. Lastly, pricing is much more competitive starting at $1,390 for a complete system compared to a starting price of $1,990.

For more information on the PureAire Oxygen Monitoring System, contact PureAire Monitoring Systems, Inc., 557 Capital Drive, Lake Zurich, IL 60047; phone 888-788-8050 or 847-726-6000; fax 847-726-6051; or email info@pureaire.net.  You may also visit the company’s website at www.Pureairemonitoring.com.


Best Oxygen Monitors for the New Millennium

Oxygen monitors have become a required piece of safety equipment for many industrial and laboratory environments, where the release of certain toxics can create an area unsafe for living beings (human or animal).  When making a purchasing decision on any oxygen detection monitor, one need look no further than the sensor cell found at the heart of the monitor.  While each oxygen deficiency monitor manufacturer will have their on design of the enclosure, along with the display and alarm, it’s the sensor that drives the performance and value of the device. 

Enter PureAire Monitoring Systems, with the best oxygen monitor.  Focus on delivering a more accurate solution at a lower cost of ownership became a driving force for Founder and President, Al Carrino.  “The consumer deserves a device that ensures a safe environment at a low cost of ownership.  I’m not interested in selling replacement sensor cells; I’m interested in building referenceable, happy, and loyal customers, “ says Carrino.

PureAire found the solution in a Zirconium Oxide (ZrO2) sensor, which is designed to last 10+ years with no maintenance.  Further, it operates without any environmental drift and is accurate in environments as low as –40º C.  The ZrO2 sensor does not rely on partial pressure, or need a reference gas, common to the disposable EC sensor.  Also contributing to its lower cost of ownership, unlike EC cells, no electrolyte is required to power the monitor, as all electricity is provided by its 24VDC power source.

In the world of Oxygen (O2) deficiency monitors, there has been little differentiation between manufacturers over the last three decades.  The standard has been a disposable electrochemical (EC) sensor, which delivered industry acceptable performance at an economical price.  The value was reduced however, due to the need for required frequent maintenance, including monthly and quarterly calibration.  This is due to changes in the performance of the cell as it depletes over time and use.  Without maintenance, inaccurate readings occur, resulting in false alarms, or worse, no alarm.  Other issues include inaccuracies due to the environment.  EC sensors are subject to environmental drift with barometric pressure changes, and can fail if put in extreme cold temperatures (a common need for an oxygen deficiency monitor is in freezers).  The cost of ownership is further impacted by the need to purchase a replacement cell, when calibration to acceptable standards is no longer possible.

Other features of the PureAire Oxygen Deficiency Monitor is the ability to be linked to any distributed control system or programmable logic controller, and can be placed in a NEMA 4X enclosure for all environmental conditions. Optional user-adjustable alarm relays and audible alarms are available.

Combining the superior performance of the ZrO2 and PureAire’s proprietary technology has changed the playing field, with the consumer coming out the winner.

About PureAire Monitoring Systems, Inc.
PureAire is the industry leader in gas monitoring solutions enabling organizations to ensure safe work environments, minimize compliance risk, and reduce associated costs. Over 1,000 organizations across the globe use PureAire gas monitoring solutions. Beginning in 1996, PureAire’s growth has been a result of an unbeatable combination of innovation and experience in solving safety and environmental needs for customers, as well as a total commitment to supporting the customer 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

For more information on the PureAire Oxygen Monitor, contact PureAire Monitoring Systems, Inc., 557 Capital Drive, Lake Zurich, Illinois 60047; Phone - (888) 788-8050, Fax - (847) 726-6051.
Find us on the web at www.PureAireMonitoring.com, and www.MonitorOxygen.com.


PureAire Oxygen (O2) Monitor Used in MRI Rooms Around The World


In the early 1980’s, there were 12 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machines in use.  Today, there are approximately 25,000 around the globe.  One item in common is their use of Helium.  Liquid Helium is most often associated with party balloons and funny voices, but 20% of the world supply of this super-cooled gas is used in MRI equipment.  Liquid helium is extremely cold (-450° F), which is necessary to cool the magnets and get optimum performance from the $3M piece of equipment.

One problem with using the gas is that it displaces oxygen, and without oxygen, people and animals suffocate.  Look no further than the relatively recent death of a young party-goer who inhaled the gas to make her voice squeaky.  Her oxygen levels dropped to a deadly rate.

Helium is a nontoxic, odorless, colorless, nonflammable gas stored in cylinders at high pressure. It can cause rapid suffocation when concentrations are sufficient to reduce oxygen levels below 19.5%. It is lighter than air and may collect in high points or along ceilings. Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) may be required by rescue workers.1

If a helium leak occurred in a MRI room, asphyxiation can occur, creating a dangerous environment for both facility workers and patients.  For that reason, Oxygen Deficiency monitors are recommended in MRI facilities.  PureAire Monitoring Systems Oxygen Monitors are becoming the newest safety product amongst MRI users, thanks to its 10 + year sensor.  Unlike its competitors, PureAire’s sensors do not require maintenance or replacement parts and are not impacted by environmental drift.  This means no false alarms or failures due to depleted sensors.  Further, the “set it and forget it” nature of the solution translates to the lowest cost of ownership in the industry. 

The PureAire Oxygen Monitor has been used around the world for the last 14 years.  The high reliability, low cost and PureAire’s commitment to customer satisfaction make it a customer favorite.

“Thanks again for your support. The oxygen monitors are in their respective locations and are functioning as designed. Nice unit! Everyone thinks they are a great product. The software menu is easy to use and could not be easier to operate.” - Dominion Nuclear

“The O2 monitors are working well and doing a great job!  Alarm relays are configured with the exhaust fan and is triggered a couple of times a day if we have cryogenic bottles in the area.  Excellent product, repeatable, and reliable as advertised.”  - Gulfstream Aerospace                                                                                   
For more information, please visit our web site at: www.PureAireMonitoring.com, or www.MonitorOxygen.com.

If you have any questions, we’d love to speak with you.  Call us at:  1-888-788-8050

About PureAire Monitoring Systems, Inc.
PureAire is the industry leader in gas monitoring solutions enabling organizations to ensure safe work environments, minimize compliance risk, and reduce associated costs. Over 1,000 organizations across the globe use PureAire gas monitoring solutions. Beginning in 1996, PureAire’s growth has been a result of an unbeatable combination of innovation and experience in solving safety and environmental needs for customers, as well as a total commitment to supporting the customer 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

1) Air Products. (1997). MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET. http://avogadro.chem.iastate.edu/MSDS/helium.pdf


Hypoxico Selects PureAire Oxygen Deficiency Monitors…Again

Lake Zurich, IL and New York, NY, October 1, 2012 - Hypoxico (www.hypoxico.com), the world leader in altitude simulation, has once again selected PureAire Monitoring Systems’ (www.pureairemonitoring.com) Oxygen Deficiency Monitor to meet its customer’s needs for safety and accuracy.  Since 2006 PureAire Monitoring Systems O2 Monitors have been used in Hypoxic High Altitude Training rooms. The use of high altitude training rooms continues to rise among athletes looking for a more effective workout.  The philosophy behind this trend is to lower the breathable oxygen to emulate training at higher altitudes, making for a more strenuous workout.

Some clients reported to use these altitude training systems include Prince Harry, Lance Armstrong, David Beckham, Cleveland Indians, Bear Grylls, and Michael Phelps. The training system may include high altitude “sleeping tents”.  Many other athletes and organizations use altitude training as part of their exercise routine.

PureAire’s Oxygen Deficiency monitor uses a zirconium oxide sensor. The end result is a monitor that does not require maintenance or calibration and is not subject to environmental “drift”.  For these reasons, PureAire has been specified as the best fit for Hypoxico’s altitude solutions.  The sensor life expectancy is 10+ years.  In addition, the sensors provide complete linearity across the full scale of 0-25% giving an almost analyzer quality for the athletes.

Gary Kotliar, President, Hypoxico, Inc. - “Prior to selecting PureAire, we were plagued with monitors that required regular calibration, replacement, and repair.  We evaluated multiple solutions and chose PureAire as the only monitor that met our customer’s requirements for a no maintenance solution that delivered quality, accuracy, and low cost.  PureAire’s commitment to customer service is icing on the cake.”

Al Carrino, President, PureAire Monitoring Systems -
“We are pleased to continue our partnership with Hypoxico.  As the leader in altitude simulation, it is important they continue to deliver value to their customers in the form of an industry leading solution that includes a high quality monitoring system that is easy to own and offers the lowest total cost of ownership.  We are excited to be part of this growing market.”

About Hypoxico, Inc.
Hypoxico is the leading provider of high altitude training solutions to both individuals and organizations around the globe.  Hypoxico offers the highest quality products geared toward the three most effective methods of altitude training,

  • "Live High, Train Low"
  • Altitude Workouts
  • Intermittent Hypoxic Training (IHT)

The proven benefit of altitude training includes maximized speed and endurance, elevated strength and power, and enhanced energy levels and overall wellness.  For more information, visit www.hypoxico.com

About PureAire Monitoring Systems, Inc.
PureAire is the industry leader in gas monitoring solutions enabling organizations to ensure safe work environments, minimize compliance risk, and reduce associated costs.  Over 1,000 organizations across the globe use PureAire gas monitoring solutions.  Beginning in 1996, PureAire’s growth has been a result of an unbeatable combination of innovation and experience in solving safety and environmental needs for customers, as well as a total commitment to supporting the customer 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.  For more information, visit www.pureairemonitoring.com.


Are you using the right monitor for CO2?

Carbon dioxide, (CO2) detectors are commonly used to protect workers from leaks in fast food establishments and restaurants.  The OSHA, ACGIH and NIOSH CO2 threshold limit value for 8 hours, (TLV) is 5,000 PPM, and the ACGIH and NIOSH short-term exposure level, (STEL) is 30,000 PPM.  Although these agencies established worker exposure levels, they also all state:
"The health effects of Carbon dioxide is a simple asphyxiant (HE17)." 1

Workers have been seriously injured due to exposure to oxygen deficiency in fast food facilities due to faulty or non-responsive CO2 monitors.

It is fact that a carbon dioxide leak from a faulty beverage dispensing system in a work environment displaces oxygen. The real health hazard is not from exposure to CO2, it's from a lack of oxygen.   "Carbon dioxide gas is an asphyxiant with effects due to lack of oxygen." 2

"Inhaling large concentrations causes rapid circulatory insufficiency leading to coma and death. Asphyxiation is likely to occur before the effects of carbon dioxide overexposure." 3 

Virtually every publication and article written about CO2 exposure indicate that the real risk to life and health is from a lack of oxygen.  CO2 monitors can not detect oxygen deficiency so why do fast food establishments and restaurants rely on them for protecting their workers when the real risks are from a lack of oxygen?

PureAire manufactures an Oxygen monitor designed to instantly detect the smallest changes in oxygen levels as a result of a CO2 leak. The earth is a wonderful source of calibrated oxygen and unlike CO2 monitors that read 0% even when the oxygen level is lower, PureAire reads continuously monitors the actual oxygen level 24-7.  It's designed to instantly alarm to hazardous levels caused by a CO2 leak. 

PureAire’s oxygen monitor uses a 10+ year no maintenance no calibration sensor.  All monitoring system functions are 100% supervised and fault protected.  Workers are always assured of continuous protection from oxygen deficient environments from leaking CO2 and alerted in the event of a failure.  In addition the oxygen monitor has built-in alarm relays for controlling automated ventilation fans or connecting to standard fire alarm panels. 

It’s proven that a CO2 leak causes asphyxiation well before the effects of overexposure, and CO2 monitors can not be used to detect lower oxygen levels, then it's clear that companies are using the wrong monitor!

A major producer of CO2 gas actually uses PureAire oxygen monitors in their gas processing plants because of their concern of lower oxygen levels due to CO2 releases.  We agree with them.

Please contact PureAire toll free at 888-788-8050 for more information or visit PureAire websites, www.MonitorOxygen.com or www.PureAireMonitoring.com.

  1. United States Department of Labor, Occupational Safety & Health Organization, CO2, Chemical Sampling Information, Carbon dioxide. Revision date 9/20/2001
  2. Praxair Material Safety Data Sheet, Product: Carbon Dioxide P-4574-J Date: July 2007
  3. BOC Gases, Material Safety Data Sheet, MSDS: G-8 Revised: 6/7/96

Is your company using Nitrogen or other Cryogenic gases? Why PureAire Recommends an O2 Deficiency Monitor for Safety.

PureAire Monitoring Systems, Inc. focuses solely on safety in the workplace, and in laboratory environments. Oxygen deficiency monitors are used in areas using Nitrogen, Helium, Argon, and Carbon Dioxide. PureAire strongly recommends an oxygen deficiency monitor to be installed anywhere cryogenic gases are being stored.

The purpose of an oxygen monitor is to alert employees in the immediate area if there is a spill of nitrogen with audible alarm. The use of an O2 monitor creates a safer environment for employees and can alert local fire panels in a building as well. In New York, NY any area using more than 50 gallons of nitrogen the law states, it is mandatory for an oxygen monitor to be installed.

The largest problem with these specialty gases are, if a spill occurs there is no noticeable scent or effects. A nitrogen spill can create an oxygen deficient environment rapidly within seconds. For the time it takes the body to realize there is zero breathable oxygen, it is too late. A person will pass out from oxygen deprivation immediately. This is one of the most preventable incidents; simply install an oxygen deficiency monitor for safety.

Consider an argument for medicine. If one was to travel to the Amazon in South America, where malaria is common, being unaccustomed to the jungle, wouldn't it be wise to take malaria pills? What if you have a family history of diabetes? As a family member you may consider taking any necessary precautions to possibly eliminate the concern of diabetes. Maybe by being more physically active, or having a healthier diet, this may delay or stop the onset of diabetes.

An oxygen monitor is also similar to a Fire detector in your home or office. You never expect to have a fire, but a fire detector is installed for safety as a precaution.

PureAire feels the oxygen monitor is the preventative medicine. Scientists and researchers will always continue to use nitrogen for their experiments. Doctors will continue to use helium to cool the large magnets used for images in the MRI scanner. Carbon dioxide will still be used for all beverage dispensing systems at fast food chains. The one factor people cannot eliminate is the use of cryogenic gases used in everyday life. The only known safety, and scientifically proven device is the oxygen deficiency monitor.

The rooms dimensions, a size of the cylinders, the quantity of the cylinders, the types of cryogenic gas being used, whether the gas is being piped into a room, and  height of the ceiling all play a role on where, and how many monitors are required. PureAire often gets the question, where do we place the oxygen monitor? How many O2 monitors should we use?

A few simple tips can help save a life. Helium is lighter than air, so it is recommended to mount the monitor closer to the ceiling, whereas nitrogen/argon is heavier than air, so mounting the monitor closer to the ground would make sense. Carbon dioxide is also heavier than air settling to the ground.

PureAire manufactures oxygen deficiency monitors for many different areas. In all cases PureAire use an oxygen deficiency monitor using a 10+ year sensor. PureAire can be contacted at 1-888-788-8050, http://www.MonitorOxygen.com, and http://www.PureAireMonitoring.com.


PureAire Monitoring Systems Grows their Sales Once Again.

In the past year PureAire Monitoring Systems has grown at the rate of 50%.  PureAire is known for the manufacturing and selling of safety gas monitors. There monitors are used in environments such as laboratories, pharmaceutical industries, medical laboratories, universities, nitrogen manufacturing plants, cold storage warehouses, and other various areas where air conditions can be at risk PureAire started in 1997 and has continued to develop new gas monitors for safety in the workplace. They are continuing to push the envelope of technology with the help of well esteemed engineers, and president.

One monitor that has helped attribute to PureAire’s sales is their Oxygen Monitor. Known as the Aircheck TX-1100-DRA, this monitor uses a 10+ year sensor technology which has left their competitors in the dust. Being sold since the 1970’s by their affiliate company Bionics, PureAire re-engineered the monitor and complimented the sensor technology, ultimately increasing the accuracy and stability. The newly developed 3.05 revision software update has even outperformed their previous tests. In addition to their newly designed software, there is a built in horn/strobe, LCD backlight digital display, 2 user selectable alarms, and a 4-20 mA signal for control panels. There hassle free Oxygen Monitor is being used at the most prestigious Universities such as Harvard, UCSB, UC Berkeley, and Cornell.

In addition to, a more recent sought out monitor has been their Methyl Bromide Monitor for fumigation. A monitor being sold for many years, also received an update in their software and hardware. Since 2008, PureAire received a EPA, DPR, and USDA compliancy for their safety methyl bromide monitor in the workplace. PureAire is the only company that makes a 24/7 supervised Ch3Br monitor used to measure in the ppm. Repeatable and reliable tests prove the monitor can be used to measure less than 1ppm. Low.4ppm or 400 ppb can be measured in areas containing methyl bromide gas. Before PureAire’s monitor, sampling tubes (Draeger or Kitagawa Colorimetric Tubes) were the only option to take a real time sample. To measure an air sample, an employee would need to take it him/herself. This ultimately brought up a safety concern for the employees, especially if there is a high concentration of methyl bromide in the area.

Primary areas where PureAire’s methyl bromide monitors are be sold are in cold storage facilities housing pre-fumigated produce before distribution throughout the country. For example, grapes are being shipped abroad to US ports. Before they are distributed to local grocery stores they are fumigated with Ch3Br in high concentrations eliminating pests, etc. Fumigation also ensures the produce is safer before being sold to consumers. The monitors are also used for the residual fumigation of walnuts, asparagus, avocados, apples, and strawberries

Also, PureAire is working on a multi point methyl bromide monitor which is in pre-production stages, hoping to be released to the public in the first quarter for 2012. This will be a 4 channel monitor for clients interested in monitoring 4 separate areas. As PureAire continues to grow, so will the development of newer and edgier products.

You can contact PureAire Monitoring Systems, Inc at www.PureAireMonitoring.com; and www.MonitorOxygen.com. PureAire’s toll free number is 1-888-788-8050, or 1-847-726-6000.


PureAire’s Oxygen Monitor uses a 10 + Zirconium Oxide O2 Sensor: Unlike the 1000 C degree Stack O2 sensors.

PureAire makes an Oxygen monitor for laboratories where nitrogen, helium, argon, carbon dioxide, and any cryogenic gases are stored. The O2 monitors are a standalone wall mounted unit with a built in audible alarm. The monitor utilizes a 10 + year Zirconium Oxide (ZrO2) sensor and has a backlit digital display showing readings of 0-25% range. PureAire has sold there O2 monitors while combining a ZrO2 sensor since the company started in 1997, and has contributed to their growth of 50% in 2011.

There are two types of ZrO2 sensors: There is a high temperature sensor (1000 C) for stack Oxygen monitoring, and a low temperature sensor PureAire uses. PureAire uses an Oxygen sensor that has a operational temperature near 400 C. Though this seems hot, the zirconium oxide sensor is quite stable and long lasting at this temperature.

The ZrO2 sensors (1000 C) commonly used for Stack O2 readings only have a life expectancy of 2-3 years. The contributing factor is the high temperatures achieved to gain there readings. PureAire utilizes a similar technology, but due to the lower (400 C) operational temperatures PureAire can increase their life expectancy to 10 years and more.

The ZrO2 oxygen sensor is very similar to the O2 sensors in automobiles for combustion. Every car has a O2 sensor and due to the long life expectancies, this is why automobile manufactures use them.

PureAire continues to strive for perfection. To maximize the most from their oxygen monitors, many years of R&D had to take place. The driving force behind developing the best oxygen monitor was the vision of making a monitor that would last for many years, and be easy for the consumer. Besides their main selling point of having a no maintenance O2 monitor, they have given the user a joystick for maneuvering  through the menus. It is responsive while working through the menus, and easy to adjust simple functions such as alarm set points.

The researchers at PureAire wanted to make it a point that nobody should confuse the two technologies of zirconium oxide sensors. While PureAire’s O2 sensor does seemingly have a high operational temperature, all automobiles use a similar technology and nobody seems to think twice about them.

PureAire has been trying to educate people about this technology for years, and companies are starting to recognize them as an industrial O2 monitor leader. 

While there are more than 2,000 PureAire oxygen monitors are in the field, people are still becoming aware every day. PureAire’s goal is to be the leading manufacture O2 monitors for 0-25% and if 2011’s growth has anything to show for it, I think they will.

If you want to become a distributor, please call PureAire Monitoring Systems, Inc  at 1-888-788-8050, or on the web at www.PureAireMonitoring.com; and www.MonitorOxygen.com.


PureAire Makes Oxygen Monitor for Nitrogen Generators.

Nitrogen generators are most commonly used in areas where on-demand nitrogen is preferred rather than, storing liquid nitrogen (LN2) in cylinders.  Nitrogen generators have a lower cost of operation, and can be used where smaller amounts of nitrogen are needed. Nitrogen generators are used in the pharmaceutical industry, testing laboratories, cryogenic facilities, welding manufactures, and petrochemical environments.

The question often comes up from a safety standpoint, is nitrogen a safe? The answer is usually no. An Oxygen Monitor is needed where LN2 or nitrogen generators are stored.  Nitrogen makes up roughly 70% of the air we breathe, though oxygen is only 20.9%. Oxygen is a precious gas that we take for granted. Ultra pure 99.9% nitrogen is unsafe in confined spaces, and nitrogen generators are usually stored in these types of areas. PureAire has developed an Oxygen Monitor with a 10+ year sensor made specifically for nitrogen storage areas, and nitrogen generators.

PureAire’s O2 Monitor uses a called Zirconium Oxide sensor. Most Oxygen Monitors use a disposable electrochemical sensor that typically only has a life expectancy of 12-18 months along with other complications. Some examples of problems with the electrochemical sensors are: drifts to thunderstorms, or barometric pressure changes, humidity changes, and temperature fluctuations.

PureAire has pioneered the way using a zirconium oxide oxygen sensor. The technology used is far more advanced than the “Old style,” electrochemical sensors. The sensor used is based on ions being passed through the sensor, and at 20.9% oxygen a certain quantity of ions cross the sensor. Thus, giving a current to the monitor giving an accurate reading between 0-25%.  If the oxygen concentration has been lowered, fewer ions cross the sensor hence, lowering the reading on their display. Intuitively, if there is higher known concentration of oxygen, so will the sensors readings on the PureAire Oxygen monitor.

The crucial understanding of the sensor is what gives PureAire’s clients the 10+ life expectancy and accuracy.  Another great property of the ZrO2 sensor is NO CALIBRATION is required. The sensors ion technology limits the need to calibrate. PureAire’s Oxygen monitor does not have problems with barometric pressure, temperature, or humidity changes. PureAire’s O2 Monitors are completely stable     (-40c to 50c) in all environments.

Nitrogen generators create high pressure in the cylinder after the gas has been created. This can be dangerous especially, overnight while employees are not in the proximity. PureAire also has a feature called latching. If there is a leak overnight, the alarm can stay alerted until the client turns off the switch in the morning.

PureAire is also looking for distributors to help distribute their oxygen monitors. In the past year PureAire has grown 50% and is continuing to gain more recognition. The demand for the O2 monitors has been more abundant exponentially. The PureAire ion based technology O2 monitor should be the only monitors being sold for 0-25% due to the lack of maintenance and calibration.

If you have anymore questions, please contact PureAire sales at www.PureAireMonitoring.com, or www.MonitorOxygen.com. The toll free number is 1-888-788-8050, or call 1-847-726-6000. Local fax number is 1-847-726-6051.


PureAire Oxygen Monitor Lights the way to Safety with 10+ Year Sensor.

Gas leaks are among the most common risks when storing or using liquid nitrogen, helium, CO2 or argon cylinders in a confined space. With inert cryogenic gases, loose or broken fittings can leak gas into a room, displacing oxygen, causing impaired judgment or loss of life to workers. To guard against this potential situation, oxygen deficiency monitors are ideal in the workplace. Specifically, PureAire, a supplier of oxygen deficiency monitors, offers a monitor that uses a non-depleting zirconium oxide sensor that has a 10+ year sensor life and requires no calibration or periodic maintenance.

According to Air Liquide and Irish Oxygen’s Nitrogen Safety Sheet, “cryogenics are mostly stored in confined spaces such as offices, freezers or hallways. One of the most overlooked additions to having LN2, He, Ar or CO2 cylinders ranging from 25 to 250 lb is the O2 monitor. MSDS sheets all have a variation of information mentioning high pressure and suffocation with no odor. In high concentrations, asphyxiation occurs with no warning. Symptoms may include loss of mobility/consciousness and [workers] must apply artificial respiration if breathing [has] stopped.”

The rapid release of nitrogen and various other cryogenics show absolutely no signs of immediate danger. NIOSH and OSHA state anything under 19.5% oxygen is considered hazardous and a dangerous environment for employees. The earth is a wonderful source of calibrated oxygen and we breathe 20.9% of it. PureAire’s oxygen detector is one of the most widely used real-time monitors for detecting leaks among cryogenic gas cylinders in storage rooms. If a gas spill or leak occurs, PureAire’s oxygen monitor is designed to turn on strobes and audible alarms to warn workers to evacuate the location. It also has built-in relays that can active ventilation fans to bring in fresh air.

PureAire’s oxygen monitor uses a 10+ year zirconium sensor, requiring zero maintenance and calibration. Because of its lasting electrochemical sensor, unlike other monitors that may use depleting ones, PureAire’s Oxygen Monitor helps labs save money in the long-term. Additionally, built-in “supervised watchdog” software continuously monitors all instrument functions 24/7. It is not affected by humidity, temperature or changes in barometric pressure, including changes caused by thunderstorms.

Feel free to contact us at PureAire’s website www.pureairemonitoring.com, or www.monitoroxygen.com.We can also be reached at 1-888-788-8050, or 1-847-726-6000. PureAire has been in business since 1997, and has a continued growth of 30% per year. Al Carrino is the President, and Brandon Alan is the VP of sales.


PureAire Makes Oxygen Monitor for Nitrogen Generators.

Nitrogen generators are most commonly used in areas where on-demand nitrogen is preferred rather than, storing liquid nitrogen (LN2) in cylinders.  Nitrogen generators have a lower cost of operation, and can be used where smaller amounts of nitrogen are needed. Nitrogen generators are used in the pharmaceutical industry, testing laboratories, cryogenic facilities, welding manufactures, and petrochemical environments.

The question often comes up from a safety standpoint, is nitrogen a safe? The answer is usually no. An Oxygen Monitor is needed where LN2 or nitrogen generators are stored.  Nitrogen makes up roughly 70% of the air we breathe, though oxygen is only 20.9%. Oxygen is a precious gas that we take for granted. Ultra pure 99.9% nitrogen is unsafe in confined spaces, and nitrogen generators are usually stored in these types of areas. PureAire has developed an Oxygen Monitor with a 10+ year sensor made specifically for nitrogen storage areas, and nitrogen generators.

PureAire’s O2 Monitor uses a called Zirconium Oxide sensor. Most Oxygen Monitors use a disposable electrochemical sensor that typically only has a life expectancy of 12-18 months along with other complications. Some examples of problems with the electrochemical sensors are: drifts to thunderstorms, or barometric pressure changes, humidity changes, and temperature fluctuations.

PureAire has pioneered the way using a zirconium oxide oxygen sensor. The technology used is far more advanced than the “Old style,” electrochemical sensors. The sensor used is based on ions being passed through the sensor, and at 20.9% oxygen a certain quantity of ions cross the sensor. Thus, giving a current to the monitor giving an accurate reading between 0-25%.  If the oxygen concentration has been lowered, fewer ions cross the sensor hence, lowering the reading on their display. Intuitively, if there is higher known concentration of oxygen, so will the sensors readings on the PureAire Oxygen monitor.

The crucial understanding of the sensor is what gives PureAire’s clients the 10+ life expectancy and accuracy.  Another great property of the ZrO2 sensor is NO CALIBRATION is required. The sensors ion technology limits the need to calibrate. PureAire’s Oxygen monitor does not have problems with barometric pressure, temperature, or humidity changes. PureAire’s O2 Monitors are completely stable     (-40c to 50c) in all environments.

Nitrogen generators create high pressure in the cylinder after the gas has been created. This can be dangerous especially, overnight while employees are not in the proximity. PureAire also has a feature called latching. If there is a leak overnight, the alarm can stay alerted until the client turns off the switch in the morning.

PureAire is also looking for distributors to help distribute their oxygen monitors. In the past year PureAire has grown 50% and is continuing to gain more recognition. The demand for the O2 monitors has been more abundant exponentially. The PureAire ion based technology O2 monitor should be the only monitors being sold for 0-25% due to the lack of maintenance and calibration.

If you have anymore questions, please contact PureAire sales at www.PureAireMonitoring.com, or www.MonitorOxygen.com. The toll free number is 1-888-788-8050, or call 1-847-726-6000. Local fax number is 1-847-726-6051.


PureAire's Oxygen Monitor for Liquid Nitrogen Storage uses a 10+ Year sensor.

PureAire Monitoring Systems manufactures a variety of safety gas monitors, including the top selling oxygen monitor. PureAire’s oxygen monitors are used in areas containing liquid nitrogen, bulk nitrogen, or nitrogen Dewar storage. Recently, there has been a heightened awareness of nitrogen dangers in confined spaces, and ultimately an increased demand for fixed oxygen monitors. For years oxygen monitors have been used in confined spaces, but portable monitors were primarily used. Fire marshal’s, EH&S officers, and safety departments are now requiring companies to use oxygen monitors in almost all areas containing nitrogen tanks.

Typical facilities using LN2 (liquid nitrogen) are nitrogen manufacturers laboratories, semiconductor, cleanrooms, cryogenic freezers, food industries, NMR (nuclear Magnetic resonance) suites, cryopreservation, and confined spaces. Recently, PureAire has been working with companies like Praxair, Air Liquide, Air Gas, and Air products to help distribute to their clients. They believe PureAire has an alternative that is unlike anything else they have seen in the industry.

PureAire’s oxygen monitor uses a unique ZrO2 sensor with a 10+ year life expectancy. Also, more importantly the sensor is linear from 0-25%. If a client’s criterion requires seeing 15% oxygen, PureAire’s oxygen monitor will be accurate within .1%. The proprietary electronics is the backbone of the oxygen monitor. Other ZrO2 oxygen monitors exist though can only see an accurate reading at 20.9% due to lack of its electronics package.

Numerous tests have showed PureAire’s oxygen monitors readings are comparable to very expensive Oxygen monitor analyzers in the percent range. Though not marketed as an analyzer, if the client needs a cost competitive real-time monitor in the percent, nobody can match the precision PureAire’s oxygen monitor offers. Analyzers are accurate and dependable but are known for their constant calibration, and lack of real time monitoring.

PureAire requires no calibration, no replacement sensors, no maintenance, and no drifting to thunderstorms (change in barometric pressure).

Important questions to ask when purchasing a oxygen monitor? (This does not apply to PureAire)

1. How often do you calibrate a sensor?
2. How often do you replace a sensor?
3. How much does a sensor cost?
4. How long is the wait time to get a replacement sensor?
5. What is the shelf life of a sensor?
6. What happens if you do not calibrate a sensor?
7. What is the accuracy of the monitor?

Answer: Use a PureAire monitor.

If you have anymore questions please feel free to call 1-888-788-8050 or find PureAire at www.MonitorOxygen.com, or www.PureAireMonitoring.com.

Increased Demand for PureAire's Oxygen Monitor for Nitrogen and Helium Storage

When storing or using Liquid Nitrogen, Helium, CO2, or Argon cylinders in a confined space, what are the potential risks? Gas leaks are the most common, requiring the need for an oxygen deficiency monitor for protecting employees in the workplace.  With inert cryogenic gases, loose or broken fittings can leak gas into a room displacing oxygen, causing impaired judgment or loss of life to workers.  PureAire, one of the leading suppliers of Oxygen Deficiency Monitors uses a non-depleting zirconium oxide sensor that has a 10+ year sensor life and requires no calibration or periodic maintenance.

“Cryogenics are mostly stored in confined spaces such as, offices, freezers, or hallways. One of the most overlooked additions to having LN2, He, Ar, or CO2 cylinders ranging from 25-250lbs is the O2 monitor. MSDS sheets all have a variation of information mentioning, high pressure and suffocation with No Odor1.”  “In high concentrations, asphyxiation occurs with no warning.  Symptoms may include loss of mobility/consciousness and must apply artificial respiration if breathing stopped2.”

The rapid release of nitrogen, and other various cryogenics possess absolutely zero signs of immediate danger. NIOSH, and OSHA states anything under 19.5% oxygen is considered hazardous, and a dangerous environment for employees.  The earth is a wonderful source of calibrated oxygen and we breath 20.9% Oxygen.  PureAire’s Oxygen detector is one of the most widely used real time monitors for detecting leaks among cryogenic gas cylinders in storage rooms.  If a gas spill or leak occurs, PureAire’s Oxygen monitor is designed to turn on strobes and audible alarms to warn workers to evacuate the location.  It also has built-in relays that can active ventilation fans to bring in fresh air.

PureAire’s Oxygen monitor uses a 10+ year zirconium sensor. The monitor requires zero maintenance, and calibration because of its non-depleting long life sensor.  Built in “supervised watchdog” software continuously monitors all instrument functions 24-7.  PureAire’s Oxygen monitor is not affected by humidity, temperature, or changes in barometric pressure.  Rapidly changing barometric pressure changes from thunderstorms will not disrupt PureAire’s Oxygen Deficiency Monitor.  The majority of oxygen deficiency monitors sold use depleting electrochemical sensors that need complete replacement frequently.  PureAire’s Oxygen monitor can save up to $400 annually in replaceable sensors.

Please read more about PureAire Monitoring Systems products at www.PureAireMonitoring.com or call 1-888-788-8050.

 

1) Air Liquide. (2009). GENERALITIES:N2 THE PROTECTIVE GAS  http://encyclopedia.airliquide.com/Encyclopedia.asp?GasID=5#GeneralData

2) Irish Oxygen. (October 10, 2007). Nitrogen MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET. http://www.irishoxygen.com/msds/ioc-msds-nitrogen.pdf


PureAire Receives CE Approval on its Oxygen Monitor with 10+ Year Sensor.

PureAire Monitoring systems, the proud manufacture of their oxygen monitor has received a CE approval. The recent CE approval is monumental for PureAire selling to European countries. PureAire has been selling their O2 monitors in the USA for over 11 years. With a larger demand from their clients it was certain a CE approval would be beneficial to their product line, especially in Europe. PureAire’s oxygen monitor is highly revered for its 10+ year sensor requiring no replacement sensors, calibration, or maintenance.

When PureAire’s VP of Sales, Brandon Alan was asked, why is your O2 monitor different? Brandon explained the background of oxygen monitors; he discusses there is a lengthy maintenance process required to have a properly functioning monitor, until we, PureAire came out with the Aircheck Oxygen Monitor.

Brandon States, “About 95% of all Oxygen Monitor manufacturers use a continuous depleting sensor for O2 their readings. Clients will replace sensors on average from 12-18 months at $250 per sensor, and requires quarterly calibrations if their lucky. We have overcome the burden for our clients, and have provided an O2 monitor that is ultimately hassle free by using the zirconium oxide sensor. Gaining recognition of PureAire’s oxygen monitors has been an uphill battle, but companies are catching on quickly.”

So, where might you find Oxygen monitors being used?

Brandon: “Oxygen monitors are used in areas where the client may be worried for their safety due to a potential low oxygen level. More recently MRI rooms have been a risk due to the helium storage in the large magnet MRI scanners. Most people are not aware of the risks associated with helium. Most people joke if there was a leak of helium, they would talk like Mickey Mouse. Though, I do find humor in high talking Walt Disney characters, this can be a very serious matter. Our typical oxygen monitor client uses liquid nitrogen cylinders, nitrogen dewars combined with confined spaces, and laboratories containing cryogenics. The three largest Cryogenic gases (Oxygen depleting gases) are Nitrogen (N2), Argon (Ar), Helium (He), and Carbon dioxide (CO2).”

How do you see the CE approval helping your oxygen monitors sales?

Brandon: “I anticipate once the message gets out that we have a CE approval, European companies will start to take notice of our monitors. We understand in order to sell our products to other European countries we must have an approval. I am hoping companies will use our oxygen monitors based on our technology. Were hoping the old throw away sensor technology becomes an idea of the past in Europe, and our O2 monitor with 10+ year sensor becomes the product for the future.”

Contact PureAire Monitoring systems by calling 1-888-788-8050. Websites for PureAire are www.PureAireMonitoring.com, and www.MonitorOxygen.com.


Oxygen (O2) Monitors: Disposable Sensors eating your Cash? PureAire Introduces 10 + Year Sensor.

[stx-pa-gas-monitor] PureAire Monitoring Systems is a leading manufacturer in the gas monitoring industry. When it comes to O2 deficiency monitors PureAire makes the most reliable, longest lasting, and affordable oxygen monitors.

It has been an international standard for the past three decades to use oxygen monitors with disposable sensor cells, (electrochemical sensors). All disposable sensors require frequent maintenance, monthly and quarterly calibration (false alarm if not calibrated), and usually drift to changes in barometric pressure. At PureAire, we made a point to fix this familiar problem and offer you a solution. We created a better product, one that eliminates the inconveniences of disposable sensors while continuing to meet your needs.

The 10+ Year O2 Deficiency Monitor is a unique product offered by PureAire. The Zirconium Oxide (ZrO2) sensor is the key technology that has allowed us to continue providing reliable and long lasting monitors over the years.

The ZrO2 sensor does not rely on partial pressure, or need a reference gas like disposable sensors. Also, our sensor does not require electrolyte, a depleting source of power, while disposable sensors require this fluid to give the sensor its power. Our sensor’s power comes from 24VDC, and does not have a depleting source. PureAire’s 10+ Year 02 Deficiency Monitor is much more reliable, requires no maintenance, and does not need to be calibrated. There zirconium sensor does not have the biases associated with the disposable sensor technology. This means no more false alarms and drifting, and an always-accurate reading.

With over 1,000 monitors in the field, PureAire continues to gain support amongst its users with a hassle free O2 monitor for safety. With our O2 Monitor you can be assured if there is a leak from any cryogenic gas (LN2, He, Ar, and CO2), our built-in audible will go off without any false alarms.